David Kaniaupio III » The Portal

The Portal

Welcome to David "Mr. K" Kaniaupio's Portal
 
DO NOT USE THE GOOGLE CLASSROOM THAT YOU WERE INVITED TO!  USE THE OFFICIAL GOOGLE CLASSROOM!
 
 
Instructions for Students
  1. Log in to the right Google Classroom  
    1. Period 1 (10th Grade US History) join code: mrgfufz
    2.  Period 2 (9th Grade World History) join code: mhzvrgm
    3. Period 4 (9th Grade World History) join code: 2xbfips
    4. Period 5 (10th Grade US History) join code: e43ezak
    5. Period 7 (9th Grade World History) join code: 4d77lwa
  2. Open up the Resource Page for your US or World History
    1. 9th Grade World History Resource Page - https://qrgo.page.link/4PYwL
    2. 10th Grade US History Resource Page - https://qrgo.page.link/RpD4h
Instructions for Parents/Guardians
  1. Please fill out the contact information form below for the appropriate social studies class so that we can work together to support your student's success.  
    1. 9th Grade World History link - https://forms.gle/Ee6UCDdUtvLqCC4QA
    2. 10th Grade US History link - https://forms.gle/GUEYSADRd8Teu79s8
  1.  
Breaking News
  1. Virtual learning will start on Wednesday, August 19 with your A group (A-Ke).  You will virtually meet with your B group (Ki-Z) on Thursday, August 20.  Since you have your list of students, send them a welcoming email.  Please include an email to your Advisory students also.
  1. Device pick-up will happen on the following days. This will have affect traffic patterns. See map of traffic patterns. 

Date

Time

Student’s Last Name

Monday 8/17/20

8:30 - 11:00 am

12:30 - 3:00 pm

A-F

G-K

Tuesday  8/18/20

8:30 - 11:00 am

12:30 - 3:00 pm

 
 
*See the map below for Device Pick Up instructions.

Grading:

Grading for this course is broken up into three categories: Summative Assessments, Class Work, & Citizenship. Research shows that the 3rd most powerful tool for student learning is Self Reporting Grades.  It only ranks behind the first and second most powerful factors for student learning: high expectations and effective instruction.  Self Assessing is a major element of this course and all students are required to know what they are supposed to learn, identify where they are in the process of learning, and identify to what degree they were successful in meeting the standards.  All work will only be graded once students have self assessed their learning.  Failing to self assess will result in a zero for that assignment.


Summative Assessments

Summative Assessments measure the mastery of standards and skills and they are worth 50% of the total grade and every unit will have at least one summative assessment. Examples of these types of assignments would be projects, essays, research papers, debates, and presentations.


Class Work

All work that’s not summative assessment will fall into the class work category worth 35% of the total grade.  Generally all class work will be assigned in class where students will usually have enough time to complete the assigned work.  There may be some instances where homework will be assigned but those instances are few and far between.  However, in the event that the safety recommendations require adjustments, this class could be subject to require more work at home in order to satisfy safety requirements.  The majority of the work assigned will be in the form of Daily Worksheets (DW) that students will access through Google Classroom.  Aside from a few exceptions summatives and class work will be due by 3:00 on the last day of the quarter. If the work has already been graded students are able to resubmit the work to have it re-graded but they must email the teacher and include the link to the assignment that they want re-graded.


Citizenship

Citizenship Points are points that are used to reward students for thinking and acting on behalf of their community and they are worth 15% of their total grade.  These points will be given when students behave appropriately and they will be taken when students act inappropriately or against the interests of the community. Students will need to earn 3 citizenship points per day to get full credit.  If students attend class and are on task they will receive the 3 citizenship points that they need to get full credit.  Students must be present to earn citizenship points and students who are absent must make those points up if they choose to get full credit.   Students will be given additional points for participating in class, helping out their classmates,cleaning and maintaining the classroom, helping their school and or helping their community.  Citizenship points will be removed for being off task, breaking classroom procedures, not maintaining the class and equipment properly, and for failing to bring the required items such as their planner and school ID. 


Grading

  • Summative Assessments = 50%
      • Essays
      • Research Papers
      • Projects
      • Tests
  • Class Work = 35%
      • (DW) Daily Worksheets
      • Educational Activities
      • Homework
  • Citizenship = 15%
    • Participation
    • Behaving Appropriately
    • Contributing to their community

Course Description:

This course is the World History Social Studies graduation requirement.  This class is designed to cover the content standards thematically while focusing on the development of 21st century skills.  Students will be expected to master the following standards and skills listed below.  This class is discussion based and students will make connections between the content that they are learning and their own personal lives.  This way, students develop multiple perspectives, empathy for those who see differently, as well as a more intricate understanding of the world they live in. This class will require students to read and view texts that discuss topics that range from the bloody campaigns of the Ottoman Empire to the brutality of trench warfare in world war 1.  As a result, students will be engaging and discussing material that can be controversial in nature.  With that being said, it is important that they are allowed to develop these nuanced understandings of government, power, and culture through critical thinking and intellectually safe discourse.


Disclaimer: This syllabus is for school year 2020 to 2021 during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.  As safety recommendations are provided this class along with the school year will adapt in every aspect necessary to provide the safe learning environment that your student and his or her family deserve.


Content Standards

Skills

Quarter 1

Culture and Institutions

  • SS.11.3.1 Examine the relationship between cultural traditions and the larger societies in the cases of Confucianism in China, Buddhism in Asia, Christianity in Europe, Hinduism in India, and Islam in the Muslim world 
  • SS.11.3.2 Examine the effects of global interactions in pre-modern times, including the Mongol conquests, the Crusades, and technological, biological, and commercial exchanges 
  • SS.11.3.5 Examine the political structure in major world regions, including Qing China at the time of the Kangxi emperor, Japan at the time of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Ottoman Empire at the time of Suleyman the Magnificent, and the Hapsburg Empire at the time of Charles V 

Quarter 2

Colonization

  • SS.11.3.3 Explain the impact of the exploratory and commercial expeditions in the 15th and 16th century, including the voyages of Zheng He, Vasco da Gama, Christopher Columbus, Ferdinand Magellan, James Cook, and European voyages to North America 
  • SS.11.3.4 Explain the effects of global exchanges in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa, including the spread of food crops and diseases, the exchange of trade goods, and migrations of peoples (forced and voluntary) 
  • SS.11.3.6 Examine the major developments in European cultural and intellectual history, including the Renaissance, Reformation, Enlightenment, and Scientific Revolution 
  • SS.11.3.9 Explain the ideological and economic interests that drove European, American, and Japanese imperialism in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific 
  • SS.11.7.1 Trace changing political boundaries under the influence of European imperialism 

Quarter 3

Capitalism

  • SS.11.3.7 Compare the causes and effects of the early modern democratic revolutions, including the American Revolution, French Revolution, Haitian Revolution, and South American revolutions 
  • SS.11.3.8 Describe the socio-economic impact of the industrial revolution
  • SS.11.3.11 Explain the rise of fascist governments, emergence of communism, and the global effects of the Great Depression 
  • SS.11.3.15 Describe revolutionary movements from 1945-1989, including the Chinese communist revolution, the Algerian revolution, and the Cuban revolution 
  • SS.11.4.1 Compare the features of republican and absolutist governments that emerged in 17th century Europe 
  • SS.11.8.3 Describe how the determinants of demand (i.e., income, substitutes, complements, number of buyers, tastes, expectations) affect the price and availability of goods and services
  • SS.11.8.4 Describe how the determinants of supply (i.e., price and availability of inputs, technology, government regulation, number of sellers) affect the price and availability of goods and services 

Quarter 4

WW1

  • SS.11.3.10 Describe the role of secret alliances and nationalism in triggering the outbreak of World War I and the effort to prevent future wars by the establishment of the League of Nations
  • SS.11.7.2 Use tools and methods of geographers to understand changing views of world regions 
  • SS.11.3.14 Explain major political developments of the post-war era, including the establishment of the United Nations, the creation of Israel, and the Cold War 

World War 2

  • SS.11.3.12 Examine the significant events, technological developments, and turning points of World War II, including the German invasion of Poland, Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, DDay, the American bombing of Japan, the Rape of Nanjing, and the Holocaust 
  • SS.11.3.13 Describe post-World War II nationalist and independence movements in India, Pakistan, Nigeria, and Kenya 

Modern Times

  • SS.11.3.16 Examine the significant effects of technological developments and biological exchanges in the contemporary world 
  • SS.11.3.17 Examine critical human rights issues in the contemporary world
  • SS.11.8.1 Explain how the exchange rate affects trade, imports, exports, and the economy of a nation 
  • SS.11.8.2 Describe the distribution of the world’s resources as it affects international economic relationships

Quarter 1

  1. Time Management
  2. Self Assessment
  3. Team Work
  4. Problem Solve
  5. Generate Inquiry
  6. Think Critically
  7. Form Arguments
  8. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  9. Engage in Discourse
  10. Workplace Readiness

Quarter 2

  1. Focus Note Taking
  2. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  3. Engage in Discourse
  4. Evaluate Political Lenses
  5. Mark the Text
  6. Summarize Text
  7. Synthesize Information from 2 or More Sources
  8. Research Using Credible Sources 
  9. Evaluating Primary Sources
  10. Evaluating Secondary Sources
  11. Organize an Argumentative Essay
  12. Write an Argumentative Essay
  13. Self Assessment

Quarter 3

  1. Design Thinking
  2. Teamwork and Collaboration
  3. Creative Approaches
  4. Identifying Obstacles
  5. Problem Solving
  6. Time Management
  7. Initiating Cold Contact
  8. Research
  9. Data Collection
  10. Public Speaking
  11. Creating and Documenting Measurable Change
  12. Self Assessment

Quarter 4

  1. Focus Note Taking
  2. Test Taking Skills
  3. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  4. Engage in Discourse
  5. Evaluate Political Lenses
  6. Mark the Text
  7. Summarize Text
  8. Synthesize Information from 2 or More Sources
  9. Research Using Credible Sources 
  10. Evaluating Primary Sources
  11. Self Assessment

Course Description:

This course is the U.S. History Social Studies graduation requirement.  This class is designed to cover the content standards thematically while focusing on the development of 21st century skills.  Students will be expected to master the following standards and skills listed below. This class is discussion based and students will make connections between the content that they are learning and their own personal lives.  This way, students develop multiple perspectives, empathy for those who see differently, as well as a more intricate understanding of the world they live in. This class will require students to read and view texts that discuss topics that range from brutality of trench warfare in world war 1 to the complexity of the Civil Rights Movement and the War on Terror.  As a result students will be engaging and discussing material that can be controversial, but it is important that they are allowed to develop nuanced understanding of these issues. They will develop their own ideas about the role of government and both domestic and foreign policies through critical thinking and intellectually safe discourse.


Disclaimer: This syllabus is for school year 2020 to 2021 during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.  As safety recommendations are provided this class along with the school year will adapt in every aspect necessary to provide the safe learning environment that your student and his or her family deserve.


Content Standards

Skills

Quarter 1

Immigration and Community

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.1 Describe the "push" factors (e.g., escaping persecution and poverty) and "pull" factors (e.g., seeking freedom and economic opportunity) that brought immigrants to the United States in the late 19th century
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.2 Describe social, political, economic, and technological factors (e.g., governance, corruption, fiscal policies, wages, sanitation, class differences, health problems, transportation) of growth in 19th and 20th century American cities (e.g., New York, Chicago, St. Louis)

Quarter 2

The Gilded Age, the Progressive Era and American Imperialism

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.3 Describe how business magnates (i.e., Rockefeller, Morgan, Carnegie and Vanderbilt) dominated politics of the Gilded Age
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.4 Describe reform issues of the Progressive Era (including political reform, labor reform, and business regulation)
    • Benchmark SS.10.3.5 Describe the causes of and major events associated with the United States becoming an imperial power in the late 19th century
    • Benchmark SS.10.3.6 Analyze the scope and evolution of various United States foreign policies in the early part of the 20th century
    • Benchmark SS.10.3.12 Describe the innovations in transportation and communication and the impact they had on American society
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.13 Analyze the causes of the Great Depression
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.14 Describe the effects of the Great Depression
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.15 Explain how programs in FDR's New Deal, including the FDIC, AAA, WPA, and Social Security, attempted to resolve problems brought on by the Great Depression

Quarter 3

Civil Rights

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.24 Analyze the key factors, including legislation and acts of civil disobedience, that brought on the African American Civil Rights movement after World War II
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.25 Describe the significant events, individuals, and groups associated with the Civil Rights Era
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.26 Describe the expansion of the Civil Rights movement to other groups, including Native Americans and women
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.28 Explain the emergence and impact of the student movements and the counterculture of the 1960s
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.29 Evaluate Lyndon Johnson's vision of the Great Society

Q4 World War 1 

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.7 Describe the events that led the United States into World War I
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.8 Describe how domestic policies were affected by American involvement in World War I
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.9 Explain why the United States did not sign the Treaty of Versailles

World War 2

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.16 Analyze the causes of the bombing of Pearl Harbor
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.18 Explain the turning points in the European and Pacific theaters of World War II
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.19 Describe how domestic policies were affected by United States involvement in World War II

Cold War 

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.20 Explain the origins of the Cold War
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.21 Explain how America's foreign policy during the Cold War led to conflicts in Asia and Latin America
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.22 Explain how the events of the Cold War led to the McCarthy era
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.23 Explain how the United States foreign policy has attempted to respond to global and economic challenges of the post Cold War world
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.27 Assess John F. Kennedy's handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis

Modern Times

  • Benchmark SS.10.3.30 Explain how the Watergate affair led to a crisis of confidence in the government
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.31 Explain how the election of Ronald Reagan marked a new era of conservatism in American politics
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.32 Explain how the administrations from Reagan to the current president dealt with major domestic issues
    • Benchmark SS.10.3.15 Explain how programs in FDR's New Deal, including the FDIC, AAA, WPA, and Social Security, attempted to resolve problems brought on by the Great Depression
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.16 Analyze the causes of the bombing of Pearl Harbor
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.17 Analyze the effects of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, including the internment of Japanese Americans
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.18 Explain the turning points in the European and Pacific theaters of World War II
  • Benchmark SS.10.3.19 Describe how domestic policies were affected by United States involvement in World War II

Quarter 1

  1. Time Management
  2. Self Assessment
  3. Team Work
  4. Problem Solve
  5. Generate Inquiry
  6. Think Critically
  7. Form Arguments
  8. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  9. Engage in Discourse
  10. Workplace Readiness

Quarter 2

  1. Focus Note Taking
  2. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  3. Engage in Discourse
  4. Evaluate Political Lenses
  5. Mark the Text
  6. Summarize Text
  7. Synthesize Information from 2 or More Sources
  8. Research Using Credible Sources 
  9. Evaluating Primary Sources
  10. Evaluating Secondary Sources
  11. Organize an Argumentative Essay
  12. Write an Argumentative Essay
  13. Self Assessment

Quarter 3

  1. Design Thinking
  2. Teamwork and Collaboration
  3. Creative Approaches
  4. Identifying Obstacles
  5. Problem Solving
  6. Time Management
  7. Initiating Cold Contact
  8. Research
  9. Data Collection
  10. Public Speaking
  11. Creating and Documenting Measurable Change
  12. Self Assessment

Quarter 4

  1. Focus Note Taking
  2. Test Taking Skills
  3. Communicate Arguments Verbally
  4. Engage in Discourse
  5. Evaluate Political Lenses
  6. Mark the Text
  7. Summarize Text
  8. Synthesize Information from 2 or More Sources
  9. Research Using Credible Sources 
  10. Evaluating Primary Sources
  11. Self Assessment